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Kazimir Malevich
Kazimir Malevich - Black Cross Bag - by LOQI

Regular price $12.99

Details

Foldable tote bag in pouch

Featuring  Black Cross (1923) by Kazimir Malevich

Weight56 g (1.98 oz).
Bag can carry: 20 kg (44 lbs).

Dimensions: 50 x 42 cm (19.7" x 16.5").
Zip pocket: 11 .5 x 11.5 cm (4.5" x 4.5").
Handle: 27 cm (10.6").

Water resistant
made of polyester.
STANDARD 100 by OEKO-TEX® certified.

Clear Composition. Radical reduction. A strong statement. A striking sign. Don’t be afraid to make a visual power play with Malevich’s Black Cross tote bag. © Musée national d’Art moderne Paris.

The spring of minimalism. From an artistic revolution to a fashion trend. Meet the Russian pioneer of abstract art, Kazimir Malevich. Master of minimal. Painterly pioneer. Radical Revolutionary. Born to Polish parents, but raised and trained in Russia, Kazimir Malevich was a 20th century avant-garde artist best known for his super simplified, geometric paintings.

    Kazimir Malevich

    Kazimir Malevich was a pionnering Russian painter and founder of the Suprematist movement. His seminal Black Square (1915) and Suprematist Composition: White on White (1918), are often cited as some of the first abstract paintings ever produced. “The black square on the white field was the first form in which nonobjective feeling came to be expressed,” Malevich wrote. “The square = feeling, the white field = the void beyond this feeling.” Born on February 23, 1878 in Kiev, Ukraine, he studied at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture where he learned to paint in an impressionistic style. At school, he fell in with the Russian avant-garde group known as the Soyuz Molodyozhi, led by Vladimir Tatlin, and participated in their group shows. In 1915, the artist laid out his beliefs in an iconic manifesto, outlining Suprematism and the value of pure aesthetic feeling derived from geometric shapes. Malevich would briefly come into celebrity, with exhibitions throughout Europe, before being condemned as a bourgeois artist by the Stalinist regime. Forced to adapt, Malevich returned to his earlier style of depicting peasants and landscapes in a traditional Impressionist-like style. He died of cancer on May 15, 1935 in Leningrad, Soviet Union at the age of 57. Mourners at his funeral rally waved a banner bearing his Black Square. Today, his works are held in the collections of The Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Tate Gallery in London, the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, the Kunstmuseum Basel, and the Albertina in Vienna, among others.

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