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Wolfgang Tillmans
Wolfgang Tillmans Truth Study Center

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The underbelly of the world and the pursuit of impossible truth.

In his third Taschen book, celebrated artist photographer and winner of the 2000 Turner Prize Wolfgang Tillmans takes his exploration of the visible world to a new level. The title "Truth Study Center" is a tongue-in-cheek reference to the paradox of our desire to find a universal truth and the impossibility of doing so.

From evocative nude studies and candid personal portraits of Tony Blair to astronomical views of planet Venus passing over the disc of the sun, for the first time the full width of Tillman's world is brought together in one book. Also included is an extensive selection of striking new abstract works, which through their vivid colors and compositions evoke bodily as well as atmospheric sensations.

From nightlife to still life, Tillmans shows us another side of the world we live in today. This is edited and designed by Tillmans himself.

Wolfgang Tillmans

Wolfgang Tillmans, (born August 16, 1968, Remscheid, West Germany), German photographer whose images of the everyday span from street photography to portraiture to landscape and still life to abstraction. In 2000 he became the first non-British artist to win the Turner Prize, and he was a recipient of the Hasselblad Award in 2015. Tillmans first experimented with photography in 1987 by enlarging found photographs with a photocopier. He bought his first camera the following year. In the late 1980s he immersed himself in the club scene and gay nightlife in Hamburg and began taking pictures at that time. He submitted those photographs to the British magazine of fashion and contemporary culture i-D, which published them. He continued to publish his work in that magazine into the 21st century. In 1990 he moved to Bournemouth, England, to study art for two years at Bournemouth and Poole College of Art and Design. He settled in London in 1992 and the next year exhibited an unframed photograph from his Lutz & Alex series—casual portraits of two decidedly androgynous friends—at Unfair, an art fair in Cologne for emerging artists. As a result of that exhibition, his career took off in Europe. Art book publisher Taschen produced a book of his work in 1993, and Tillmans began exhibiting frequently. He also found success in New York City and exhibited widely while living there in 1994–95 and onward. He continued to rely on i-D and other magazines, however, as a regular venue for his work. In 1997 Tillmans created a now well-known series of seemingly mundane images documenting the last month in the life of his partner, Jochen Klein, who died of AIDS. Following Klein’s death, which had a notable impact on the photographer, Tillmans’s work gained a stronger political angle, and he became a more vocal advocate for the LGBTQ communities. His was the winning design for an AIDS memorial in Munich (installed 2002).

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